Faslodex - Fulvestrant Injection

What is this medication?

FULVESTRANT (ful VES trant) treats breast cancer. It works by blocking the hormone estrogen in breast tissue, which prevents breast cancer cells from spreading or growing.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): FASLODEX

What should I tell my care team before I take this medication?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • Bleeding disorder
  • Liver disease
  • Low blood cell levels, such as low white cells, red cells, and platelets
  • An unusual or allergic reaction to fulvestrant, other medications, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • Pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • Breast-feeding

How should I use this medication?

This medication is injected into a muscle. It is given by your care team in a hospital or clinic setting.

Talk to your care team about the use of this medication in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

Keep appointments for follow-up doses. It is important not to miss your dose. Call your care team if you are unable to keep an appointment.

What may interact with this medication?

  • Certain medications that prevent or treat blood clots, such as warfarin, enoxaparin, dalteparin, apixaban, dabigatran, rivaroxaban

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medication?

Your condition will be monitored carefully while you are receiving this medication. You may need blood work while taking this medication.

Talk to your care team if you may be pregnant. Serious birth defects can occur if you take this medication during pregnancy and for 1 year after the last dose. You will need a negative pregnancy test before starting this medication. Contraception is recommended while taking this medication and for 1 year after the last dose. Your care team can help you find the option that works for you.

Do not breastfeed while taking this medication and for 1 year after the last dose.

This medication may cause infertility. Talk to your care team if you are concerned about your fertility.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medication?

Side effects that you should report to your care team as soon as possible:

  • Allergic reactions or angioedema—skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, eyes, lips, tongue, arms, or legs, trouble swallowing or breathing
  • Pain, tingling, or numbness in the hands or feet

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your care team if they continue or are bothersome):

  • Bone, joint, or muscle pain
  • Constipation
  • Headache
  • Hot flashes
  • Nausea
  • Pain, redness, or irritation at injection site
  • Unusual weakness or fatigue

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medication?

This medication is given in a hospital or clinic. It will not be stored at home.

NOTE: This sheet is a summary. It may not cover all possible information. If you have questions about this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider.

© 2023 Elsevier/Gold Standard (2009-02-07 00:00:00)

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