Medrol - Methylprednisolone Tablets

What is this medication?

METHYLPREDNISOLONE (meth ill pred NISS oh lone) treats many conditions such as asthma, allergic reactions, arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, adrenal, and blood or bone marrow disorders. It works by decreasing inflammation, slowing down an overactive immune system, or replacing cortisol normally made in the body. Cortisol is a hormone that plays an important role in how the body responds to stress, illness, and injury. It belongs to a group of medications called steroids.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): Medrol, Medrol Dosepak

What should I tell my care team before I take this medication?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • Cushing's syndrome
  • Eye disease, vision problems
  • Diabetes
  • Glaucoma
  • Heart disease
  • High blood pressure
  • Infection especially a viral infection, such as chickenpox, cold sores, or herpes
  • Liver disease
  • Mental health conditions
  • Myasthenia gravis
  • Osteoporosis
  • Recent or upcoming vaccine
  • Seizures
  • Stomach or intestine problems
  • Thyroid disease
  • An unusual or allergic reaction to lactose, methylprednisolone, other medications, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • Pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • Breastfeeding

How should I use this medication?

Take this medication by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Take this medication with food. If you are taking this medication once a day, take it in the morning. Do not take it more often than directed. Do not suddenly stop taking your medication because you may develop a severe reaction. Your care team will tell you how much medication to take. If your care team wants you to stop the medication, the dose may be slowly lowered over time to avoid any side effects.

Talk to your care team about the use of this medication in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, talk to your care team. You may need to miss a dose or take an extra dose. Do not take double or extra doses without advice.

What may interact with this medication?

Do not take this medication with any of the following:

  • Alefacept
  • Echinacea
  • Live virus vaccines
  • Metyrapone
  • Mifepristone

This medication may also interact with the following:

  • Amphotericin B
  • Aspirin and aspirin-like medications
  • Certain antibiotics, such as erythromycin, clarithromycin, troleandomycin
  • Certain medications for diabetes
  • Certain medications for fungal infections, such as ketoconazole
  • Certain medications for seizures, such as carbamazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin
  • Certain medications that treat or prevent blood clots, such as warfarin
  • Cholestyramine
  • Cyclosporine
  • Digoxin
  • Diuretics
  • Estrogen or progestin hormones
  • Isoniazid
  • NSAIDs, medications for pain and inflammation, such as ibuprofen or naproxen
  • Other medications for myasthenia gravis
  • Rifampin
  • Vaccines

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medication?

Tell your care team if your symptoms do not start to get better or if they get worse. Do not stop taking except on your care team's advice. You may develop a severe reaction. Your care team will tell you how much medication to take.

This medication may increase your risk of getting an infection. Tell your care team if you are around anyone with measles or chickenpox, or if you develop sores or blisters that do not heal properly.

This medication may increase blood sugar levels. Ask your care team if changes in diet or medications are needed if you have diabetes.

Tell your care team right away if you have any change in your eyesight.

Using this medication for a long time may increase your risk of low bone mass. Talk to your care team about bone health.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medication?

Side effects that you should report to your care team as soon as possible:

  • Allergic reactions—skin rash, itching, hives, swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat
  • Cushing syndrome—increased fat around the midsection, upper back, neck, or face, pink or purple stretch marks on the skin, thinning, fragile skin that easily bruises, unexpected hair growth
  • High blood sugar (hyperglycemia)—increased thirst or amount of urine, unusual weakness or fatigue, blurry vision
  • Increase in blood pressure
  • Infection—fever, chills, cough, sore throat, wounds that don't heal, pain or trouble when passing urine, general feeling of discomfort or being unwell
  • Low adrenal gland function—nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, unusual weakness or fatigue, dizziness
  • Mood and behavior changes—anxiety, nervousness, confusion, hallucinations, irritability, hostility, thoughts of suicide or self-harm, worsening mood, feelings of depression
  • Stomach bleeding—bloody or black, tar-like stools, vomiting blood or brown material that looks like coffee grounds
  • Swelling of the ankles, hands, or feet

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your care team if they continue or are bothersome):

  • Acne
  • General discomfort and fatigue
  • Headache
  • Increase in appetite
  • Nausea
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Weight gain

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medication?

Keep out of the reach of children and pets.

Store at room temperature between 20 and 25 degrees C (68 and 77 degrees F). Throw away any unused medication after the expiration date.

NOTE: This sheet is a summary. It may not cover all possible information. If you have questions about this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider.

© 2023 Elsevier/Gold Standard (2022-02-21 00:00:00)


Additional Information From Chemocare.com About Medrol

Self-Care Tips:

  • If you are on Medrol for a long period of time, you may be more susceptible to infection. Wash your hands well, and report any symptoms of infection to your healthcare provider if noted.
  • In a pill form: Take Medrol with food to lessen an upset stomach. Also take Medrol  early on in the day (before 12:00 noon, if possible), so you will be able to sleep better at night.
  • If you have diabetes, Medrol may increase your blood sugar levels. Notify your healthcare provider that you are diabetic. You may need close monitoring.
  • Drink 2 to 3 quarts of fluid every 24 hours, unless you were told to restrict your fluid intake, and maintain good nutrition. 
  • To reduce nausea, take anti-nausea medications as prescribed by your doctor, and eat small, frequent meals.
  • In general, drinking alcoholic beverages should be avoided.  You should also limit caffeine intake (colas, tea, coffee and chocolate, especially). These beverages may irritate your stomach.
  • If you experience symptoms or side effects, especially if severe, be sure to discuss them with your health care team.  They can prescribe medications and/or offer other suggestions that are effective in managing such problems.

When to contact your doctor or health care provider:

Contact your health care provider immediately, day or night, if you should experience any of the following symptoms:

  • Fever of 100.4° F (38° C), chills (possible signs of infection)
  • If you feel an irregular or fast heartbeat, shortness of breath, or chest or jaw pain, seek emergency help and notify your healthcare provider.
  • If you become suddenly confused.

The following symptoms require medical attention, but are not emergency situations.  Contact your health care provider within 24 hours of noticing any of the following:

  • Extreme fatigue (unable to carry on self-care activities)
  • Any unusual bleeding or bruising
  • Black or tarry stools, or blood in your stools or urine
  • Nausea (interferes with ability to eat and unrelieved with prescribed medications)
  • Vomiting (vomiting more than 4-5 times in a 24-hour period)
  • Dizziness or lightheadedness, feeling faint.
  • Persistent headache
  • Severe hot flashes or mood swings
  • Inability to sleep (insomnia)
  • Severe skeletal (bone) pain
  • Difficult or painful urination; increased urination, or severe thirst
  • Changes in vision, blurred vision, eye pain, enlarged pupils, discharge
  • Any new rashes or changes in your skin
  • Swelling of the feet or ankles.  Sudden weight gain (greater than 3 pounds a week)
  • Swelling, redness and/or pain in one leg or arm and not the other

Always inform your health care provider if you experience any unusual symptoms.


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